Top 10 Innovations 2016

  • Sequencing with Sequel, but with a Shocking Surprise
  • Endonuclease CRISPR-Cas9 Makes the Cut Twice—Pun Intended
  • My Predicted 2016 Innovation Winners Made Lots of News

Welcome to my first blog of the New Year, 2017! My New Year’s resolution is to continue to do my best in providing interesting and informative content about what’s trending in nucleic acid research. As in the past, this first blog of the year comments on the Top 10 Innovations in 2016 that were selected by a panel of judges and published last month in The Scientist. Also like the past, you can peruse TriLink’s top products by clicking here.

So, with an imaginary loud flourish of trumpets, read on to learn about the 10 winners, starting with 1st place.

  1. Milo from ProteinSimple enables single-cell Western blotting in a benchtop instrument that allows researchers to search for specific proteins in about 1,000 single cells simultaneously. A titered cell-suspension is pipetted on a 1-by-3-inch glass microscope slide covered by a 30-micron gel-layer dotted with 6,400 microwells. Some wells will remain empty, but ~1,000 will collect individual cells for antibody-based protein analysis, following lysis and other steps, all done automatically. Indeed simple!
  2. ExVive Human Kidney Tissue from Organovo is a replica of the kidney proximal tubule created using 3D bioprinting, which is like uber-trending 3D printing with plastic, but instead uses tiny aggregates of cells. This novel product offers drug developers a reliable means of testing for renal toxicity that is more predictive than traditional cell culture, and avoids animal testing.
  3. Sequel System from Pacific Biosystems is not neither small (see below) nor inexpensive ($350,000), but is nevertheless a third the size and weight—and half the cost—of PacBio’s original long-read, single molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencer, PacBio RS II, about which I’ve favorably blogged several times in the past. Moreover, Sequel has seven-times the throughput of PacBio RS II.

Taken from fiercebiotech.com

Development of what would become Sequel was announced by PacBio in 2013 as part of a potentially $75M deal with Roche Diagnostics aimed at DNA sequencing-based products for clinical diagnostics. Surprisingly—if not shockingly—in December 2016, after Sequel was launched, Roche stated it was terminating this deal with PacBio in order to focus on its internal development efforts.

At this time, I can only speculate that Roche’s internal efforts include single-molecule DNA sequencing using nanopore technology developed by Genia Technologies, Inc., which Roche acquired in 2014 for $125M—plus even greater contingent payments. By remarkable coincidence, I had been drafting a blog about Genia from a purely technical perspective, but will now update that for posting on January 24th as a sequel to Sequel—pun intended.

  1. Lumos from Axion Biosystems is a 48-well light-delivery device allowing researchers to incorporate cutting-edge optical assay techniques, such as optogenetics, into their in vitro research. Lumos delivers user-specified intensity and duration of light with up to four wavelengths simultaneously for assay flexibility.
  2. LentiArray CRISPR Libraries from Thermo Fisher Scientific make applying lentivirus-encoded CRISPR for gene editing more accessible to researchers. Given the continuing explosive-like interest in DNA endonuclease CRISPR-Cas9, which in 2015 also made the Top 10 cut—pun intended—I was expecting to find this endonuclease system among the 2016 Top 10, too. What surprised me, however, was seeing this system split into two parts—pun intended—i.e. CRISPR per se and separately as Cas9, which you’ll find below.
  3. nCounter Vantage 3D Panels from NanoString utilize an automated microscope that counts color-coded barcodes conjugated to target molecules that are mRNAs, DNAs, proteins, and even phosphorylation status of proteins—all at the same time, which I think is quite a technical achievement. The nCounter analysis system ranges from $149,000 to $280,000, and the nCounter Vantage 3D Panels run from $275 per sample and upward.

Taken from nanostring.com

  1. ZipChip from 908 Devices is a cleverly designed microfluidic chip that radically speeds up sample prep for mass spectrometry, requires only a few microliters of sample volumes, and broadens the range of materials that a mass spectrometer can handle. In less than 3 minutes per sample, ZipChip can process cell growth media, cell lysates, blood, plasma, or urine. The 1-by-3-inch chip is in a small box, less than a foot long, which mounts directly onto a mass spec. The device costs $30,000 and an auto sampler adds another $20,000 to the price.
  2. HAP1 Cells from Horizon have earned a spot in The Scientist Top 10 Innovations for the third year in a row—this time as Turbo GFP Tagged HAP1 Cells, which were selected for their ability to tag proteins of interest with green fluorescent protein (GFP) without requiring that the gene be overexpressed. Turbo GFP cells, which are custom-made using CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology, cost $3,400 and take about 16-18 weeks to develop.

Roger Y. Tsien (February 1, 1952 – August 24, 2016).
Taken from wikipedia.org

As a sad side note, Roger Y. Tsien, who was awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discovery and development of GFP, in collaboration with Osamu Shimomura and Martin Chalfie, passed away in 2016 at the age of 64.

  1. Prime sCMOS Camera from Photometrics is a 4.2-megapixel camera that has a built-in algorithm to reduce what is called “shot noise”—the variation inherent in measurements taken using light microscopes—without having to acquire many extra images and then average across them, or increase the light intensity, which can damage samples. The Prime sCMOS camera costs $15,950.
  2. GeneArt Platinum Cas9 Nuclease from Thermo Fisher Scientific is a recombinant Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 protein purified from E. coli that contains a nuclear localization signal that aids in delivery to target-cell nuclei, where Cas9 works in conjunction with CRISPR. I should add that CRISPR-based gene editing is alternatively achieved by transfection of Cas9 mRNA, which is offered by TriLink, and used as described in a recent exemplary publication by a team of international collaborators.

Revisiting Jerry’s Predictions for 2016 Top 10 Innovations

Devotees of my blog may recall the following predictions I offered in January 2016 as winning innovations-to-be:

  • Direct Genomics in China will resurrect and morph Helicos single-molecule sequencing into a diagnostics instrument.
  • GnuBIO—acquired by Bio-Rad—will offer its long-delayed next-generation sequencing system.

While none of these were selected by The Scientist, they did make news in various ways:

  • Oxford Nanopore’s VolTRAX system for automated sample has very recently been launched. I should also note that its tiny MinION sequencer was rocket-launched—literally—to the International Space Station (ISS) for evaluation in rapid identification of pathogens that might infect astronauts on the ISS, as I’ve commented on in a previous blog. Launch puns intended.
  • Direct Genomics recently announced its GenoCare Analyzer, the world’s first single-molecule genome sequencer that is being engineered exclusively for the clinic, and promises to improve the cost, speed, and quality of clinical genome sequencing by directly reading a patient’s original DNA or RNA molecules without prior amplification.
  • GnuBio now offers a fully integrated sequencing platform which allows users to simply load genomic DNA onto cartridge, place the cartridge into the GnuBIO sequencer, and then press “run.” Within hours, results can be exported directly from the instrument with real-time informatics onboard.

Although my picks weren’t among those in The Scientist list for 2016, I take satisfaction in believing that choosing winning biotechnology products is like art appreciation or judging beauty, both of which are in the eye of the beholder, who can disagree on what their eyes behold.

As usual, your comments are welcomed.