National ALS Advocacy Day

  • Tuesday May 16, 2017 is National ALS Advocacy Day
  • Mark Your Calendar and Get Involved!
  • Read on to Find Out Why Involvement Matters

Lou Gehrig (1903-1941). Taken from Wikipedia.org

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is more commonly referred to in North America as “Lou Gehrig disease.” Henry Louis “Lou” Gehrig was a record-setting baseball All-Star for the New York Yankees from 1923 through 1939, when he voluntarily took himself out of the lineup to stunned fans after his play was hampered by ALS. Sadly, Mr. Gehrig died only two years later, which indicates the rapidity of ALS disease progression.

ALS was first found in 1869 by French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot, but it wasn’t until Lou Gehrig’s affliction that national and international attention was brought to the disease. ALS is now known to be a group of neurological diseases that mainly involve the degeneration of nerve cells (neurons) responsible for controlling voluntary muscle movement, like chewing, walking, breathing and talking. Motor neurons are nerve cells that extend from the brain to the spinal cord and to muscles throughout the body.

Taken from irelandms.com

The disease is relentlessly progressive, meaning the symptoms get continuously worse over time. Both the upper motor neurons in the brain and the lower motor neurons in the spine degenerate or die, and stop sending messages to the muscles. Unable to function, the muscles gradually weaken, start to twitch, and waste away (atrophy). Eventually, the brain loses its ability to initiate and control voluntary movements.

Currently, there is no cure for ALS and no effective treatment to halt, or reverse, the progression of the disease. Most people with ALS die from respiratory failure, usually within 3 to 5 years from when the symptoms first appear. However, about 10 percent of people with ALS survive for 10 or more years.

It is generally estimated there are over 30,000 people living with ALS in the United States at any given time, and that the number worldwide is around 450,000. Someone is diagnosed with ALS every 90 minutes. The life-time incident rate for an average person is often estimated at between 1-in-400 to 1-in-600 people—an incidence rate comparable to that for multiple sclerosis.

Who Gets ALS and Why?

Following are some reliable facts that I selected from an authoritative NIH website for ALS:

  • ALS affects people of all races and ethnic backgrounds.
  • Caucasians and non-Hispanics are most likely to develop the disease.
  • Although the disease can strike at any age, symptoms most commonly develop between the ages of 55 and 75.
  • Men are slightly more likely than women to develop ALS. However, the difference between men and women disappears with aging.
  • Military veterans are about 1.5 to 2 times more likely to develop ALS, and is recognized as a service-connected disease by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.
  • 90% of ALS cases are considered sporadic, i.e. the disease seems to occur at random.
  • 10% of ALS cases are familial, i.e. an individual inherits the disease from his or her parents.
  • Mutations in more than a dozen genes have been found to cause familial ALS

How is ALS treated?

Riluzole. Taken from healthtap.com

No cure has yet been found for ALS. However, there are treatments available that can help control symptoms, prevent unnecessary complications, and make living with the disease easier. In 1995, the FDA approved riluzole (Rilutek), the only disease-modifying drug to date for ALS. Riluzole has multiple neural mechanisms of action, and is believed to reduce damage to motor neurons by decreasing levels of glutamate, which transports messages between nerve cells and motor neurons. Unfortunately, clinical trials in people with ALS showed that riluzole prolongs survival by only a few months.

BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics & NurOwn®

In researching clinical trials for hopefully much more effective therapies for ALS, I came across a company in Israel named BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics Inc. (BCTI) that offers a form of stem cell therapy for ALS that appears to be quite promising. Following is a short synopsis of what I found.

Space-filling model of BDNF. Taken from Wikipedia.org

BCLI has developed a patented stem cell-based technology that delivers a growth factor that can help neurons live longer at or near the site of injury or damage. More specifically, a mesenchymal stem cell isolated from an ALS patient is grown in a cell culture under certain conditions to produce a differentiated phenotype that secretes brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) at a level at least five-times greater than normal. The term “factor” is generic in biomedical parlance, and in the case of BDNF refers to a protein pictured to the right.

After these “super secreting” cells are obtained ex vivo, they are reintroduced (aka implanted) into the same ALS patient (i.e. an autologous transplant; see schematic diagram) wherein BDNF acts on neurons of the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system, helping to support the survival of existing neurons, and encourage the growth and differentiation of new neurons and synapses.

Taken from Byrne JA. Overcoming clinical hurdles for autologous pluripotent stem cell-based therapies. OA Stem Cells 2013 Sep 01;1(1):3.

Details for this cell-harvesting, ex vivo differentiation, selection, and implantation can be read in this 2014 article by BCTI in Clinical Translation Medicine. BCTI has registered these differentiated BDNF-secreting cells as NurOwn®, which I assume is intended to sound bit like “your own”—to reflect the autologous nature of the transplant—and be a linguistic blend of neuron and own. In any case, the important point is that safety and efficacy have been reported in a recently published Phase 1/2 and 2a open-label, proof-of-concept studies of patients with ALS at the Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem, Israel.

In the Phase 1/2 part of the trial, 6 patients with early-stage ALS were injected intramuscularly (IM) and 6 patients with more advanced disease were transplanted intrathecally (IT), i.e. via the spinal cord. In the Phase 2a dose-escalating study, 14 patients with early-stage ALS received a combined IM and IT transplantation of autologous BDNF-secreting cells. Interested readers can consult this publication for details, but the bottom line, if you will, was that the possible clinical benefits would be hopefully confirmed in an upcoming clinical trial.

My further research on this led to a February 2017 press release by BCTI announcing that City of Hope’s Center for Biomedicine and Genetics (CBG) in Duarte, California will produce clinical supplies of NurOwn® adult stem cells for the BCTI’s planned randomized, double-blind, multi-dose Phase 3 clinical study in patients with ALS. It added that CBG is expected to support all U.S. medical centers that will be participating in the Phase 3 trial.

A second February 2017 press release by BCTI announced an agreement with Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine (CCRM) in Toronto, Canada to support the market authorization request for NurOwn® and explore the opportunity to access Health Canada’s early access pathway for treatment of patients with ALS as early as 2018.

Other ALS Clinical Studies

My “go to” authoritative source of reliable information about clinical trials is NIH’s ClinicalTrials.gov website that has an updated database that can be searched and filtered in many ways. When I searched for ALS clinical trials that were recruiting patients, I was heartened to find over 180 studies that can be perused via this link. For each study, there is information about purpose, study design and measures, eligibility, contacts and locations.

Incidentally, as regular readers of my blog will know, modified mRNA (mod mRNA) therapeutics is a relatively new and very promising modality for treating diseases that respond to providing or supplementing proteins. Given that DNA vectors encoding BDNF mRNA are readily available, I’m hoping that a mod mRNA for BDNF will soon be investigated as yet another avenue of treatment for ALS.

Advocate for ALS!

Taken from alsa.org

The ALS Association (ALSA) has the stated mission “to discover treatments and a cure for ALS, and to serve, advocate for, and empower people affected by ALS to live their lives to the fullest.” ALSA’s website offers various ways for any individual to become an advocate for ALS, such as becoming informed and donating much needed money or time, participating in the Walk to Defeat ALS® that draws people of all ages and athletic abilities together (see picture) to honor the courageous souls who are affected by ALS, to remember those who have passed, and to show support for the cause.

One of my long-time friends has recently been diagnosed with ALS, which in part led me to research this blog to help inform him, and led me to find a Walk to Defeat ALS® in which to participate. I encourage you to do advocate for ALS in whatever way you wish and are able.

As usual, your comments are welcomed.

2 thoughts on “National ALS Advocacy Day

  1. With ALS,(amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) my first sign that something was wrong, was my slurred speech. And then the inability to eat without getting choked, strangled, and coughing. I didn’t have health care I just thought it was a stroke, When it started to get worse I went to a neurologist. I was given medications like riluzole oral to slow down the progress of the disease, nothing was really working to help my condition. Finally i started on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis herbal formula i purchased from Health Herbal Clinic, i read alot of positive reviews from other patients who used the ALS herbal treatment. I used the herbal remedy for 7 weeks, its effects on ALS is amazing, all my symptoms gradually faded away, i feed very more freely by myself now! (Visit www. healthherbalclinic. net or email at Info@ healthherbalclinic. net) I recommend this ALS herbal formula for all ALS Patients.

  2. My husband of 54 years of age got cured out from ALS diseases, He was diagnosis at the age of 48 and he have been on a sick bed for some years, he recently got cured with natural treatment from Dr Abu the herbalist healer. I’m so much happy that my husband life is back again after many years he suffered from ALS, Everyone diagnosis with ALS disease should get this natural treatment, Dr Abu email is been attached to my post contact him via
    drabumerecurecentre@gmail.com
    call or whatsApp ‎+2349075383142.

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