Your Meals, Wines and Much More are Personalized to Your DNA

  • Personalized DNA Sequencing for Lifestyle Guidance is all the Buzz
  • Vita Mojo Provides Meals to Match Your DNA Codes
  • Vinome Promises to Find Wines for Your Unique Palette
  • SlumberType Claims to Analyse Your DNA and Help You Sleep Better

Among the most significant trends in nucleic acids-based R&D these days is personalized medicine, which uses a person’s DNA sequence (or RNA expression profile) to guide the selection of the best available therapy for that person. This approach is opposite to the traditional strategy for drug development leading to “one treatment regimen for all patients.” Thus, as depicted below, major medical facilities now offer patients personalized cancer therapy based on molecular profiling that features analysis of each patient’s DNA and/or RNA markers.

Taken from pct.mdanderson.org

Scientific studies supporting advantages of nucleic acids-based personalized therapies tailored or customized for each individual are quite compelling, and definitely on the rise, based on my PubMed search results. Given this situation for medical therapies, you might wonder whether personalized nucleic acids-based strategies can be extended to other aspects of human biology, perhaps even to what each of us should eat or drink. Well, such wondering has already been done by others, and has recently led to genetic analyses moving from what I describe as “medicine to mainstream,” as you’ll now read.

Your Meals Personalised to Your DNA

Taken from foodsyoucan.co.uk

A chain of cafes in London is now catering to your body’s every whim—right down to its genetic makeup. Vita Mojo is the first in the world to create meals based on a customer’s DNA profile. It’s an avant-garde part of a huge trend for wellness and healthy eating, an industry worth $3.72 trillion—yes, trillion—across the world, according to a report by the Global Wellness Institute.

Vita Mojo customers first arrange to have their DNA analyzed, and then receive a profile of DNA markers which indicate food groups they should avoid and food groups to eat more of. The gene testing service provided by DNAFit, which was founded in 2013, costs $199 and works like this:

  • You receive a DNA collection kit from DNAFit to provide a saliva sample that is mailed to a company called Helix, which uses Illumina’s Exome+ assay to sequence all 22,000 protein-coding genes, as well as generating additional relevant genomic information.
  • DNAFit interprets your genetic data in terms of fitness or nutrition insights, to help you discover more about yourself and make better informed decisions about your wellness.
  • DNAFit provides you with actionable information about your genetics related to:
    • carbohydrate and fat response
    • lactose tolerance
    • genetic detoxification
    • anti-oxidant and omega-3 needs
    • vitamin B and vitamin D needs
    • alcohol and caffeine response

Most importantly, you also receive a 12-week personalised meal plan, recipes and shopping list. I assume this is the information used by Vita Mojo to provide you with your personalized meals. Vita Mojo, which is backed by the $7 billion French catering company Elior, is reportedly in the midst of raising more capital by crowd-funding, about which I have previously blogged. Helix located in San Carlos, California, lists Illumina among its investors in a deal reported elsewhere. Helix also lists numerous corporate partners, which segues into the next section featuring one of these partners with the clever name Vinome derived from vino (wine) and genome.

Your Wine Personalized to Your DNA

Taken from trendwatching.com

Truth be told, I first came across Vinome not via its partnership with Helix but in a Tweet that caught my attention because I enjoy wine, and follow new applications of sequencing. I was most curious about how drinking wine and sequencing were now being linked. In any case, the Tweet about Vinome led me to do some research about this new startup company that offers to personalize your wine drinking experience through sequencing your DNA, and is appropriately located in Healdsburg, which is in the heart of California’s premier wine country.

Here’s how it works:

  • Vinome cost $109.99, which includes $80 for the Helix test (sequencing of a saliva sample), and $29.99 for your Vinome Profile
  • Vinome analyzes 10 genetic markers related to smell and taste
  • The company then combines these DNA markers with your stated taste preferences to reveal your “vinome,” which is defined by the company as “your unique wine preference profile”
  • You can then join the Vinome wine club or shop its wine store to receive “boutique bottles specifically catered to your vinome results”

Vinome states that over 500 volunteers had their DNA sequenced, and then participated in blinded tasting of a spectrum of wines, answering questions about how much they liked the wines and what flavors they could taste. This data was then compared to DNA genetic markers reported in the scientific literature as important for taste and smell. The participants also answered a detailed questionnaire about their taste preferences for various foods and beverages. Vinome then developed an algorithm that combines this genetic data with taste preference information to deliver its personalized wine recommendations. Vinome works with about 50 boutique wineries and offers bottles generally priced from $18 to $50.

Not everyone, however, has hopped on the consumer sequencing band wagon. One media piece quotes a university professor and researcher as saying that “[i]t’s just completely silly. Their motto of ‘A little science and a lot of fun’ would be more accurately put as ‘No science and a lot of fun.’” Personally, I wouldn’t go so far as to say no science, but I do agree that much more correlative genetic and tasting data needs to be obtained to substantiate Vinome’s claims. Interested readers can later consult an entertaining—to me—account in Business Insider written Lydia Ramsey and titled I took a DNA test that claims to reveal the best wine for you — here’s the verdict.

Your Lifestyle Personalized to Your DNA

While researching the above stories, I happened to receive an email advertisement about Exploragen, which was described as “a new DNA lifestyle company to deliver useful DNA-based apps directly to consumers.” It went on to say that the apps from this California startup, which also utilizes the Helix platform, represent “the first online marketplace of DNA-powered consumer products [to] monitor sleep patterns and caffeine metabolism, optimize fitness, personalize cosmetics and much more.”

Taken from livescience.com

If you check out Exploragen’s website, as I did, you’ll find that the latter statements are somewhat misleading because the only app currently available is called SlumberType. This app is stated to “improve your nights and change how you feel during the day” by discovering how your DNA influences your sleep habits such as the quality of sleep and how long it takes you to fall asleep and stay asleep. SlumberType also promises to help you ‘find out how your sleep DNA relates to your diet, productivity, exercise, and caffeine consumption’.

I found some details about how SlumberType works buried in the FAQs on the website. SlumberType checks genetic variants that have been shown to be associated with sleep traits, including how long it takes you to fall asleep, how long you stay asleep, the quality of your sleep, and your genetic similarity to self-reported “morning” or “evening” persons. The SlumberType app is said to make it “simple for you to record your sleep/wake times, your morning and evening mood—plus other factors you choose—with just a few taps.” One important stated caveat is that genetic associations used by this product were originally discovered in European populations and may or may not be applicable to people from a different background.

Visitors to the website are encouraged to stay in touch as more apps are supposedly coming soon. While all of this sounds interesting, and potentially useful for some persons, I’m not convinced there will be enough early adopters to sustain Exploragen’s business model, but that’s just my humble opinion.

Closing Comments

Vinome’s use of genetic markers related to smell and taste led me to research this topic, and in so doing I found a lengthy scientific review article by Reed & Knaapila. This article is well worth a quick read to get a sense—pun intended—of what’s known about genetic markers and our senses.

In a nutshell, it’s a very complicated story because of the complexities and differences in sensory perceptions among individuals. To this point, I found the following hypothetical analysis by Reed & Knaapila to be a good example of how taste and smell genotypes may contribute to different perceptions of the same food (in this case a ham and cheese sandwich containing bread, onion, tomato, watercress, cheese, and ham).

Taken from Reed & Knaapila Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci (2012)

In this hypothetical case, sucrose in the onion will be detected by sweet receptors on the tongue, TAS1R3; glutamate in the tomato (perceived as a savory or umami taste) is sensed by the umami receptor, TAS1R3; bitterness of watercress is due to isothiocyantes detected by bitter receptors, TAS2R38; isovaleric acid in cheese has a “sweaty” odor detected by an olfactory receptor, OR11H7; ham contains androstenone having an odor called boar taint detected by OR7D4.

People with two positive alleles (+/+) perceive the compounds better than people with two negative alleles (−/−). Person 1 can taste the pleasant sweetness of the onion and the umami of the tomato but does not perceive the bitterness of the watercress or the unpleasant odors of the cheese or ham. Thus, Person 1 likes the ham sandwich more than Person 2.

Importantly, in my opinion, Reed & Knaapila note that “[p]eople eat what they like, but they also eat for many other reasons. Simple explanations of the links between sensory perception and food intake are misguided: Just as people do not choose art or music based solely on how well they can hear or see, we do not choose food based solely on the reactions of the tongue or nose. Although genetic differences determine what we can taste and smell (and at what concentration), our taste is ultimately determined by our experiences, learning, and culture, in an artistic sense, as well as in our likes and dislikes of food and drink.”

Bon appétit and à votre santé!

As usual, your comments are welcomed.

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2 thoughts on “Your Meals, Wines and Much More are Personalized to Your DNA

  1. Hi, Jerry – I’m very skeptical of the claims these companies are making. I bet they need a whole lot more data (and testing) to get to any useful result. Until then, I suspect these gimmicks are just a bunch of First-World fun and games for consumers with too much money!

    • Hi Jeremy,
      I fully agree with you, and quote the following snippet from this blog:
      “Not everyone, however, has hopped on the consumer sequencing band wagon. One media piece quotes a university professor and researcher as saying that “[i]t’s just completely silly. Their motto of ‘A little science and a lot of fun’ would be more accurately put as ‘No science and a lot of fun.’” Personally, I wouldn’t go so far as to say no science, but I do agree that much more correlative genetic and tasting data needs to be obtained…”
      -jerry

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