The Scientist’s Top 10 Innovations in 2017—and Jerry’s Top Pick

  • Multiplexed Assays Are Trending
  • Miniaturization is Big—Pun Intended
  • Jerry’s Top Pick is an Amazing 4 Inch Cube

Taken from the-scientist.com

Welcome to my first blog of the New Year, 2018! My New Year’s resolution is to “double down” by giving my best effort to provide interesting and informative content about what’s trending in nucleic acid research. Having said that, and in keeping with tradition, this first blog of the year pairs my comments on the Top 10 Innovations in 2017, as reported by the The Scientist, with my personal “fav” for the best new product launched last year.

So, with an imaginary loud flourish of trumpets, read on to learn about The Scientist’s 10 winners that I’ve listed from 10th to 1st place—to build your interest—after which I comment on my personal fav.

Top 10 Innovations in 2017 Reported by The Scientist

10. TrueCut Cas9 Protein v2 from Thermo Fisher Scientific is a next-generation CRISPR-Cas9 protein engineered to deliver maximum editing efficiency across a range of genes and standard cell lines, as well as stem cells, T cells, and primary cells.

With regard to this product, I think it’s worth mentioning that TriLink offers mRNA-encoded Cas9, as an alternative to delivering Cas9 protein per se. Also, my several past blogs on CRISPR can be accessed here.

9. TSQ Altis Triple Stage Mass Spectrometer from Thermo Fisher Scientific robustly and reliably quantitates most analyte types, even in complex samples such as plasma and tissue, thus enabling wide applicability, including forensic toxicology and clinical research.

8. Chromium from 10x Genomics for profiling single-cell gene expression, enables deep profiling of complex cell populations, is provided as a complete droplet-based system of reagents, barcodes, hardware and software for sample prep prior to high-throughput sequencing.

7. Edit-R crRNA Library—Human Genome from Dharmacon provides users with an arrayed library of synthetic crRNA guides in a “one-well-per-gene” format, with four distinct guides per gene for redundancy to improve statistical power.

6. HiBiT Protein Tagging System from Promega is a new detection system for quantifying proteins in or on a cell of interest, using a small and easily integrated 11-amino-acid tag (HiBiT) that interacts with a complementary large 156-amino-acid component leading to bioluminescence.

5. SR-X Ultra-Sensitive Biomarker Detection System from Quanterix offers more than 80 different assays to test samples (e.g. blood, serum, cerebral spinal fluid, single-cell lysates) for cytokines or other markers of neurodegeneration or neuroinflammation, and more.

4. Blaze from Intabio is a system for detecting and identifying protein isoforms that aims to save pharma companies time in lab prep work for QC of biologics manufacturing. Launch will be “within the next few months” and “pricing is still yet to be set,” according to The Scientist.

3. QGel Assay Kit for Organoids from QGel provides fully synthetic extracellular matrix to reproducibly grow research organoids, which are miniaturized and simplified version of an organ produced in vitro.

2. i-STAT Alinity from Abbott is a handheld, cartridge-based blood-testing device for user-friendly point-of-care assays on a blood sample of just several drops—including glucose levels and hematocrit—with results directly delivered to a patient’s medical record for clinicians within 2-10minutes. Alinity is available in about 50 countries, but Abbott is waiting for a few more assays to be cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration before selling it stateside.

Regarding this product, I should mention that my several past blogs on point-of-care can be accessed here.

1. IsoCode Chip from IsoCode is new single-cell technology allowing researchers to characterize cells based on the proteins they secrete—as many as 42 different cytokines, chemokines, and other types of molecules. IsoCode chips contain thousands of long microchambers that house only single cells. Within each microchamber, 15 spatially separated slots contain up to three different antibodies targeting specific secreted proteins; upon binding, each antibody fluoresces in a different color to distinguish the proteins. This provides the ability to simultaneously profile thousands of individual T cells or immune cells at one time.

Taken from The Scientist Dec 2017

IsoCode chips come in 10 different panels, ranging from 24 to 42 antibodies per panel, at a cost of $500–$600. The automated IsoLight imaging and workflow platform can be purchased starting at $200,000. But the IsoCode chips can also be paired with other fluorescence microscopy systems.

Jerry’s Fav for the Best Innovation in 2017

My personal pick for this honor goes to the world’s first on-site Legionella DNA test to prevent Legionnaires’ disease, which was released this past November by the Canadian company Spartan Bioscience. According to a press release, it is the first on-site DNA test for Legionella bacteria and it can detect and quantify Legionella in only 45 minutes, compared to 10-14 days for off-site sample analysis using traditional culturing methodology. The system pictured here consists of a coffee-cup-sized portable DNA analyzer called the Spartan Cube, which employs a single-use disposable test cartridge.

Taken from ctvnews.ca

This innovative product stood out for me because it brings together the following topics that I have separately blogged about:

  • Reoccurring outbreaks of potentially fatal Legionnaire’s disease, such as that which recently hit New York City, and also shut down Disneyland.
  • Decentralized analytical testing for more rapid “sample-to-answer” applications on-site, i.e. in the field—wherever that might be—or at point-of-care in hospitals, clinics, and elsewhere.
  • Miniaturization and simplification of qPCR using cleverly engineered devices, such as the Spartan Cube, in conjunction with single-use disposable test cartridges.

Legionella is a common environmental bacterium that can infect the cooling towers of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems of large buildings. Infected cooling towers release aerosolized water droplets contaminated with Legionella into the surrounding air. Globally, there are hundreds of thousands of office-building towers, hospitals, hotels, shopping malls, and other large buildings at risk for infection by Legionella. Weekly testing with the Spartan system can rapidly detect Legionella bacterial growth early, and thus allow cleaning and decontamination of the cooling tower before Legionella reaches dangerous levels to human health.

In addition, and also importantly, traditional culture test methods can underestimate the Legionella concentration on site. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that Legionella culture can underestimate actual Legionella levels by a factor of 10 or more. Culture incorrectly reported that water samples were negative for Legionella an average of 11.5 percent of the time when in fact they were positive.

Paul Lem. Provided by Paul Lem

According to Paul Lem, M.D., CEO of Spartan Bioscience, who I contacted about cost to customers, “the price for the Cube and Legionella tests is $5-10K/building/year, depending on the building. It’s a subscription model.”

Regarding my further inquiry about testimonials to date, Dr. Lem provided a copy of a November 26, 2017 article reported in The Globe and Mail which quotes him as saying that “several property managers are testing the device at close to 100 properties, including BGIS and Ottawa’s KRP Properties, owned by tech entrepreneur [Sir] Terry Matthews.”

The article also states that “the market could be worth billions of dollars globally, encompassing office buildings, malls, hospitals, schools, theme parks, spas and so on. ‘Nobody really knows because the market doesn’t really exist yet,’” said Lem.

For the sake of increased public safety toward exposure to Legionella, let’s all hope that this application of the amazing Spartan Cube is indeed very successful. And, moreover, that 2018 is a great year for other nucleic acids-based innovations, many of which I look forward to blogging about here.

As usual, your comments are welcomed.

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