RNA World Revisited

  • Scripps Researchers ‘Evolve’ an RNA-Amplifying RNA Polymerase 
  • It’s Used for First Ever All-RNA Amplification Called “riboPCR”
  • TriLink Reagent Plays a Role in this Remarkably Selective in Vitro Evolution Method 
Prof. Gerald Joyce & Dr. David Horning. Photo by Madeline McCurry-Schmidt. Taken from scripps.edu

Prof. Gerald Joyce & Dr. David Horning. Photo by Madeline McCurry-Schmidt. Taken from scripps.edu

Those of you who regularly read my blog will recall an earlier posting on “the RNA World,” which was envisioned by Prof. Walter Gilbert in the 1980s as a prebiotic place billions of years ago when life began without DNA. That post recommended reading more about this intriguing hypothesis by consulting a lengthy review by Prof. Gerald Joyce. Now, Prof. Joyce and postdoc David Horning have advanced the hypothesis one step further by reporting the first ever amplification of RNA by an in vitro-selected RNA polymerase, thus providing significant supportive evidence for the RNA World. Following are their key findings, which were enabled in part by a TriLink reagent—read on to find out which one and how!

In Vitro Evolution of an RNA Polymerase

Horning & Joyce designed an in vitro selection method to chemically “evolve” an RNA polymerase capable of copying a relatively long RNA template with relatively high fidelity. The double emphasis on “relatively” takes into account that the RNA World would have many millions of years to evolve functionally better RNA polymerases capable of copying increasingly longer RNA templates with increasingly higher fidelity.

As depicted below, they started with a synthetic, highly structured ribozyme (black) wherein random mutations were introduced throughout the molecule at a frequency of 10% per nucleotide position to generate a population of 1014 (100,000,000,000,000) distinct variants to initiate the in vitro evolution process. Step 1 involved 5’-5’ click-mediated 1,2,3-trazole (Ø) attachment of an 11-nt RNA primer (magenta) partially complementary to a synthetic 41-nt RNA template (brown) encoding an aptamer that binds guanosine triphosphate (GTP). In Steps 2 and 3, the primer hybridizes to template and is extended by polymerization of A, G, C and U triphosphates (cyan).

Taken from Horning & Joyce, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2016

Taken from Horning & Joyce, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2016

GTP aptamer showing red and cyan sequences corresponding to above cartoon. Taken from Horning & Joyce, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2016

GTP aptamer showing red and cyan sequences corresponding to above cartoon. Taken from Horning & Joyce, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2016

Step 4 involves binding of aptameric structures to immobilized GTP (green), then photocleavage of the 1,2,3-triazole linkage in Step 5, followed by reverse transcription to cDNA and conventional PCR in Step 6 for transcription into ribozymes in Step 7. Twenty-four rounds of this evolution by selection were carried out, progressively increasing the stringency by increasing the length of RNA to be synthesized by decreasing the time allowed for polymerization. By the 24th round, the population could readily complete the GTP aptamer shown below. Subsequent cloning, sequencing and screening were then used to characterize the most active polymerase, which was designated “24-3.”

The TriLink “Connection”

2'-Azido-dUTP (aka 2'-azido-UTP)

2′-Azido-dUTP (aka 2′-azido-UTP)

The aforementioned in vitro evolution process actually involves tons of experimental details that interested readers will need to consult in the published paper, which is accompanied by an extensive Supporting Information section. In the latter, a subsection titled Primer Extension Reaction describes 3’ biotinylation of the template RNA strand (brown in above scheme) using TriLink “2’-azido-UTP” (more properly named 2’-azido-dUTP) and yeast poly(A) polymerase, followed by click connection of the RNA template’s 3’-terminal 2’-azido moiety to biotin-alkyne. This very clever functionalization of the RNA template strand allowed for subsequent capture of the double-stranded primer extension reaction products on streptavidin-coated beads, followed by elution of the desired nonbiotinylated strand for GTP aptamer selection (Step 4 above).

Properties of RNA Polymerase 24-3

Needless to say—but I will—enzymologists and RNA aficionados will undoubtedly be interested in musing over the kinetic and fidelity properties of RNA polymerase 24-3.

The rate of 24-3 polymerase catalyzed addition to a template-bound primer was measured using an 11-nt template that is cited extensively in the literature to evaluate various ribozymes. It was found that the average rate of primer extension by 24-3 is 1.2 nt/min, which is ∼100-fold faster than that of the starting ribozyme polymerase randomly mutagenized for in vitro selection.

The NTP incorporation fidelities of the starting and 24-3 ribozyme polymerases on this 11-nt test template, at comparable yields of product, are 96.6% and 92.0%, respectively. Horning & Joyce noted that the higher error rate of 24-3 is due primarily to an increased tendency for G•U wobble pairing.

Phenylalanyl tRNA. Taken from Horning & Joyce, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2016

Phenylalanyl tRNA. Taken from Horning & Joyce, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2016

Other longer RNA templates having various base compositions or intramolecular structures were also studied, with the stated “final test of polymerase generality” being use of 24-3 to synthesize yeast phenylalanyl tRNA from a 15-nt primer (in red right). The authors humorously describe the results as follows:

“Despite the stable and complex structure of the template, full-length tRNA was obtained in 0.07% yield after 72 h. This RNA product is close to the limit of what can be achieved with the polymerase, but is likely the first time a tRNA molecule has been synthesized by a ribozyme since the end of the RNA world, nearly four billion years ago.”

Exponential Amplification of RNA

PCR is the most widely used method for amplifying nucleic acids, and involves repeated cycles of heat denaturation and primer extension. The 24-3 RNA polymerase was used to carry out PCR-like amplification, but in an all-RNA system (named riboPCR by Horning & Joyce) using A, G, C, and U triphosphates and a 24-nt RNA template composed of two 10-nt primer-binding sites flanking the sequence AGAG. Somewhat special conditions were employed:

  • The concentration of Mg2+ was reduced to minimize spontaneous RNA cleavage
  • PEG8000 was used as a “molecular crowding” agent to improve ribozyme activity at the reduced Mg2+ concentration
  • Tetrapropylammonium chloride was added to lower the melting temperature of the duplex RNA

Under these conditions, 1 nM of the 24-nt RNA template was driven through >40 repeated thermal cycles, resulting in 98 nM newly synthesized template and 106 nM of its complement, corresponding to 100-fold amplification. Sequencing of the amplified products revealed that the central AGAG sequence was largely preserved, albeit with a propensity to mutate the third position from A to G, reflecting the low barrier to wobble pairing.

Amplification of a 20-nt template (without the central insert) was monitored in real time, using FRET from fluorescently labeled primers, and input template concentrations ranging from 10 nM to 1 pM. The resulting amplification profiles shown in the paper are typical for real-time PCR, shifted by a constant number of cycles per log-change in starting template concentration. A plot of cycle-to-threshold vs. logarithm of template concentration, also shown in the paper, was linear across the entire range of dilutions indicating exponential amplification of the template RNA with a per-cycle amplification efficiency of 1.3-fold.

Implications for the Ancient RNA World

It would be an injustice to Horning & Joyce if I would try to paraphrase their concluding discussion of this investigation, so here is what they say:

The vestiges of the late RNA world appear to be shared by all extant life on Earth, most notably in the catalytic center of the ribosome, but most features of RNA-based life likely were lost in the Archaean era. Whatever forms of RNA life existed, they must have had the ability to replicate genetic information and express it as functional molecules. The 24-3 polymerase is the first known ribozyme that is able to amplify RNA and to synthesize complex functional RNAs. To achieve fully autonomous RNA replication, these two activities must be combined and further improved to provide a polymerase ribozyme that can replicate itself and other ribozymes of similar complexity. Such a system could, under appropriate conditions, be capable of self-sustained Darwinian evolution and would constitute a synthetic form of RNA life.

Applications for Today’s World of Biotechnology

The aforementioned report by Horning & Joyce has received wide acclaim in the scientific press and world-wide public media as supporting the existence of a prebiotic RNA World, billions of years ago, from which life on Earth evolved.

While the academic part of my brain, if you will, fully appreciates the significance of these new insights on “living” RNA eons ago, the technical applications part of my brain is more piqued by possible practical uses of all-RNA copying or all-RNA riboPCR.

I, for one, plan to muse over possible applications of such all-RNA systems in today’s world of biotechnology, and hope that you do too, and are willing to share any ideas as comments here.

Spartan Cube—The World’s Smallest Molecular Diagnostic Device

  • Records Are Meant to be Broken—Including Those for PCR Diagnostics
  • Spartan Bioscience Claims It’s Cube is World’s Smallest Mol Dx Device 
  • The Cube was Launched at the Recent AACC Clinical Lab Expo 

Prologue

[22]-annulene. Taken from Wikipedia.com

[22]-annulene. Taken from Wikipedia.com

In the spirit of the recent Olympic games, and as the saying goes—records are meant to be broken. When I was in grammar school, a big buzz in sports was who would be the first to break the 4-minute mile; answer: Roger Bannister in 3 minutes and 59.4 seconds in 1954—now 17 sec faster. In my college craze days, it was how many persons can fit into a Volkswagen Beetle; answer: I couldn’t find the first feat, but the current record is 20 crammed into an old style Beetle in 2010. Then during my graduate organic chemistry studies, there was interest in synthesizing increasingly larger annulenes—completely conjugated CnHn monocyclic hydrocarbons akin to benzene (n=6); answer: [22]-annulene with n=22 (see below) synthesized by F. Sondheimer. But I digress…

Our collective fascination with records—and beating them—also applies to all sorts of instruments for health-related sciences, such as the most powerful MRI imaging systems (currently from GE) or longest-DNA-sequencing system (currently from PacBio). Due to the seemingly endless utility of PCR, there is a continual stream of claims for the fastest PCR system (currently from BJS Biotechnologies) or—more to point herein—smallest PCR system.

To wit, regular readers of my blog will recall an April 2016 post titled World’s Smallest Real-Time PCR Device, which referred to a hand-held system reported by Ahrberg et al. for real-time, quantitative PCR (qPCR). That system is pictured below next to the original system commercialized by ABI in the 1990s that weighed 350 pounds and was 7 feet long!

Left: World’s smallest real-time PCR device. (Taken from Ahrberg et al). Right: Applied Biosystems 7700 real-time PCR system. (Taken from distrobio.com).

Left: World’s smallest real-time PCR device. (Taken from Ahrberg et al). Right: Applied Biosystems 7700 real-time PCR system. (Taken from distrobio.com).

It seems that PCR records fall as easily as those in the Olympics. Not even a year later, Ahrberg’s claim is being challenged by Canadian company Spartan Bioscience, which recently introduced its Cube device at the 2016 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo. Following are some technical details that I thought were worth sharing.

Taken from businessinsider.com

Taken from businessinsider.com

Cube Facts

Given its amazingly small size of only 4 x 4 x 4 inches, there apparently has been some remarkable engineering achievements to be able to squeeze-in what’s needed for the rapid heating and cooling required for PCR thermal cycling. Ditto for the optics required to enable fluorescence detection. Like other relatively small devices intended for emerging Point-of-Care (POC) applications in a doctor’s office or clinic, there is wireless connectivity to a laptop that serves as the user interface for operation and data analysis, as well as a power source for the Cube via a USB cable.

You’re likely wondering by now how much the Cube will sell for. Unfortunately, I was not able to obtain a list price from Spartan’s CEO at this time, so we’ll all have to wait and see.  I’ll post the answer as a comment to this blog as soon as I find out the price.

Inside the Cube—Perhaps 

I actually don’t know exactly what’s inside the Cube, but some possibilities of what might be are as follows. I’ve based these educated guesses on a Spartan Bioscience patent (US pat. no. 8,945,880) by Paul Lem and others entitled Thermal cycling by positioning relative to fixed-temperature heat source. As depicted below, a hot block provides a heat source at a fixed temperature to thermally cycle PCR reaction vessels that can be precisely moved by a micrometer to and from the hot block in a repeated manner.

Taken from US patent no. 8,945,880

Taken from US patent no. 8,945,880

As for how fluorescence might be measured to monitor each PCR reaction in real-time, one possibility is depicted below. Basically, each reaction tube is proximate to excitation light from an LED, and has a slit at the bottom for emitted light that is collected and processed into a typical real-time PCR curve.

Taken from US patent no. 8,945,880

Taken from US patent no. 8,945,880

Before the Cube

Prior to launching the Cube, Spartan Bioscience has been selling an FDA-Cleared in vitro diagnostic product called Spartan RX, which is also relatively compact, and carries out fully automated—“cheek swab-to-result”—PCR analysis of certain Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) genotypes. Roughly 1-in-3 people carry CYP2C19 mutations that can impair metabolism of a wide variety of commonly used drugs. Consequently, these PCR-based results are a valuable aid to clinicians in determining strategies for therapeutics that are metabolized by the Cytochrome P450 2C19.

I was favorably impressed by the fact that this CYP2C19 assay qualifies for reimbursement from Medicare and most insurers, according to the company’s website, which adds that there is an ongoing 6,000-patient clinical trial entitled Tailored Antiplatelet Initiation to Lessen Outcomes due to Clopidogrel Resistance after Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (TAILOR PCI).

The Spartan RX cheek swab POC results have been recently compared to centralized genotyping with a TaqMan® allelic discrimination assay (Life Technologies) using qPCR and with the GenID® reverse dot-blot hybridization assay (Autoimmun Diagnostika GmbH). Published results indicate excellent agreement, and led to the following conclusions by the authors: “Compared to both laboratory-based genotyping assays, the POC assay is accurate and reliable, provides rapid results, can process single samples, is portable and more operator-friendly, however the tests are more expensive.”

I look forward to finding out more about the Cube and the PCR results it can obtain. I’ll post more information on my blog as it becomes available. As usual, your comments are welcomed.

Postscript

To me, there’s something visually intriguing about a cube, perhaps because it’s one of the so-called Platonic Solids, which have been known since antiquity and studied extensively by the ancient Greeks.

Taken from acs.org

Taken from acs.org

Platonic solids such as the cube have also fascinated chemists, as evidenced by there being a substantial amount of published literature on the synthesis and physical properties of platonic solids. For example, cubane (C8H8) is a synthetic hydrocarbon molecule that consists of eight carbon atoms arranged at the corners of a cube, with one hydrogen atom attached to each carbon atom. A solid crystalline substance, cubane was first synthesized in 1964 by Philip Eaton and Thomas Cole. Prior to this work, researchers believed that cubic carbon-based molecules would be too unstable to exist.

Taken from bitrebels.com

Taken from bitrebels.com

On the fun side, the cube was morphed—so to speak—into what became an amazingly popular game, or should I say, object of competition. Rubik’s Cube is a 3-D combination puzzle invented in 1974 by Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture Ernő Rubik. If you’re wondering about the world’s record for solving this puzzle, it’s currently a mind-boggling 4.9 sec, according to a list (with video links) of this and past records that appear to have been broken regularly, just as I opined at the beginning of this blog. But I digress…yet again.

Nucleic Acid-Based Circulating Biomarkers for Cancer Diagnostics Become Reality

  • Circulating Tumor Cell Blood Tests Approved by FDA
  • Circulating DNA Stool Test Approved for Colorectal Screening to Avoid Colonoscopy
  • Circulating mRNA Urine Test Approved for use to Reduce the Total Number of Unnecessary Prostate Biopsies

Backstory

Taken from sysmex-inostics.com 

Taken from sysmex-inostics.com

According to the NIH National Cancer Institute website, ~1.6 million persons in the U.S. alone will be diagnosed with cancer this year. A very important key to survival is early detection. To enable significantly earlier diagnosis compared to manifestation of clinical symptoms, researchers have been focusing on finding DNA or RNA biomarkers that are circulating in blood, which is readily available and relatively noninvasive compared to traditional biopsies.

exosomesSome of the basic processes underlying this paradigm-shift in cancer diagnostics are depicted in the simplified cartoon wherein tumor cells, or components thereof, pass into the bloodstream. This leads to circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) to investigate and differentiate from their normal counterparts as sources of potential biomarkers.

That task is much easier said than done because of the need to sort through all of the normal components in blood, as well as deal with circulating cells and DNA derived from apoptosis (aka programed cell death) and necrosis that are normal ongoing “background” to contend with. In addition to CTCs and ctDNA, there is active cellular excretion of small (30-100 nm) exosome particles as depicted in the following graphic. Consequently, gene-encoding mRNAs, gene-regulating micro RNAs (miRNA), and potentially other exosomal components, can serve as diagnostic biomarkers.

Snapshots of Recent Commercial Diagnostic Products

My search of PubMed for publications indexed to “circulating biomarkers” AND “cancer” led to ~9,000 items, the vast majority of which have appeared during the past decade at an accelerating annual rate.  In fact, there were ~1,000 publications in 2014 alone—that’s roughly 3 such publications every day! Those interested in perusing this mountain of information later can use this link, as my intention here is to comment on resultant commercial diagnostic products, each of which provides all-important early diagnosis using a simple blood test, or urine or stool.

CTCs

In one of my blogs last year, I asserted that liquid biopsies were (metaphorically) clinically valuable “liquid gold” in a modern day Gold Rush. My evidence for the “rush” was a then recent review in Clinical Chemistry stating that “the detection and molecular characterization of CTCs are one of the most active areas of translational cancer research, with >400 clinical studies having included CTCs as a biomarker.” In that vein—double pun intended—who’s struck it rich, so to speak, commercially?

Taken from journal.frontiresin.org

Taken from journal.frontiresin.org

The answer is Veridex, which developed the CELLSEARCH® CTC Test that has the added distinction of being the first FDA-approved in vitro diagnostic (IVD) test for capturing and counting CTCs to determine the prognosis of patients (in this case for metastatic breast, colorectal or prostate cancer). This test utilizes magnetic capture of cancer-specific antibodies as depicted below.  Veridex was subsequently acquired by Jansen Diagnostics, which now offers a complete system for CELLSEARCH® CTC Test comprising sample collection, sample preparation, and sample analysis using unique immuno-magnetic and fluorescence imaging technology.

In addition, a Swiss molecular diagnostics company, Novigenix, offers its blood tests for early detection of cancer. Colox®, its lead product, is designed to significantly reduce mortality from colorectal cancer through early detection and follow-up colonoscopy. Novigenix’s technology is based on predictive gene expression profiles of circulating blood cells and tumor-derived protein markers.

Taken from Soper and coworkers in Chem. Commun. (2015).

Taken from Soper and coworkers in Chem. Commun. (2015).

Although not yet a diagnostic device, Prof. Steven Soper at UNC-Chapel Hill and a team of coworkers have recently published methods whereby captured CTCs can be enzymatically released for further analysis. This release procedure (depicted right) features use of an oligonucleotide linker containing uracil (U) that is cleaved by USER™, which consists of a mixture of uracil DNA glycosylase and DNA glycosylase-lyase endonuclease VIII.

ctDNA Biomarkers for Colon Cancer Screening

That ctDNA can provide promising biomarkers for noninvasive assessment of cancer has been successfully translated into a commercial product by Trovagene, which tests for ctDNA in urine or blood, and claims to have been the first company to have recognized the diagnostic value of ctDNA.

In addition, Cologuard® (developed by Exact Sciences in Madison, WI) was approved by the FDA as the first stool-based colorectal screening test that detects red blood cells and DNA mutations that may indicate colon cancer or precursors to cancer. Its commercials are frequently seen on TV. Given the inconvenient colon-cleansing required of patients prior to the also unpleasant invasiveness of colonoscopy, it’s not surprising that more and more persons are opting to use this new test.

In fact, Exact Sciences recently reported that during the first quarter of 2016, the company completed approximately 40,000 Cologuard® tests, an increase of more than 260% compared to approximately 11,000 tests completed in the same quarter of 2015. The cumulative number of physicians ordering Cologuard® since launch expanded to more than 32,000. Finding a doctor is relatively easy, as I found out when I located a gastrointestinal (GI) specialist near me who was also in my network—yeh!

Given the high incidence rate of colon cancer, and the traditionally recommended screening process, it was necessary for Exact Sciences to obtain compelling data in a large clinical study. An FDA announcement stated that the safety and effectiveness of Cologuard® was established in a clinical trial that screened 10,023 subjects. The trial compared the performance of Cologuard® to the fecal immunochemical test (FIT), a commonly used non-invasive screening test that detects blood in the stool. Cologuard® accurately detected cancers and advanced adenomas more often than the FIT test.

Other ctDNA Biomarkers

PlasmaSelect-R™ offered by Personal Genomics Diagnostics, which is a service company founded by experts at Johns Hopkins University, analyzes ctDNA in blood for genetic alterations in cancer based on a targeted panel of 63 well-characterized cancer genes. Cell-free DNA is extracted from plasma using proprietary methods for low-abundance sample DNA, and processed using a proprietary capture process for high-coverage next-generation sequencing to allow tumor specific mutations, amplifications, and translocations to be identified with a high sensitivity (allele fractions as low as 0.10%) and specificity. The company states that its “services further the understanding of cancer and facilitate the development of new diagnostics and therapeutics through our pioneering research approaches and novel technologies.” 

In June 2016, Roche announced that the FDA approved the cobas® EGFR Mutation Test v2 for use with plasma samples, as a companion diagnostic for the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) therapy, Tarceva®. It’s important to recognize that this is the first FDA approval of a liquid biopsy test as an aid in clinical decisions, and makes it the only companion diagnostic that is FDA-approved for the detection of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene in tumor DNA derived from plasma (or tumor tissue). NSCLC patients who have EGFR exon 19 deletions or L858R mutations are candidates for the EGFR-targeted therapy Tarceva® (erlotinib) in first-line treatment.

Circulating RNA and miRNA

The discoveries in 1999-2000 of tumor-derived RNA in the blood of cancer patients sparked a new field for studying gene expression noninvasively using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and then next-generation sequencing. The existence of circulating RNA was surprising because ribonucleases are present in blood. However, mechanisms that protect circulating RNA reportedly include complexation to lipids, proteins, lipoproteins, or nucleosomes, and protection within apoptotic bodies or other vesicular structures.

Cleverly named Molecular Stethoscope is a newish startup co-founded by uber-famous Drs. Stephen Quake and Eric Topol. The company has leveraged Quake’s finding that genome-wide analysis of circulating RNA shows tissue-specific signatures from all of the major organs can be monitored in blood, and Topol’s finding that such signatures can be used to predict imminent occurrence of a heart attack. Coronary artery disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and autoimmune/inflammatory diseases are the company’s current objectives. I’m guessing, however, that cancer might be added or licensed.

My search of the literature indicates that there are far more publications on circulating miRNA, presumably due to its greater abundance resulting from its small size and/or binding to miRNA-related proteins. The biogenesis of miRNA is depicted below.

Taken from nature.com

Taken from nature.com

A review and prospectus for circulating miRNA applied to cancer has been recently published by Bertoli et al. in an article entitled MicroRNAs: New Biomarkers for Diagnosis, Prognosis, Therapy Prediction and Therapeutic Tools for Breast Cancer. From my search of this emerging field, some exemplary commercial endeavors are as follows.

The first blood-based cancer diagnostic to exploit exosomes became commercially available in the U.S. in January 2016 via launch of ExoDx Prostate(IntelliScore) by Cambridge, MA-based Exosome Diagnostics. As reported by a large team of medical experts in JAMA Oncology, qRT-PCR was used to compare the urine exosome 3-gene expression with biopsy outcomes in patients with a range of low-to-high prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels (2 to20 ng/mL).

Taken from nature.com

Taken from nature.com

The investigators concluded that this qRT-PCR assay using urine was associated with improved identification of patients with higher-grade prostate cancer among men with elevated PSA levels and could reduce the total number of unnecessary biopsies from the ~1M total annual biopsies. The complications that have been associated with unnecessary biopsy and overtreatment range from erectile dysfunction and incontinence, to infections, sepsis and serious cardiovascular events.

At the other end of the commercial spectrum, so to speak, startup Miroculus aims to aid in the early diagnosis of cancer by making a low-cost, open-source, decentralized diagnostic they called Miriam pictured below. Their goal is for untrained workers in clinics around the world to be able to use Miriam to screen for cancer.

Taken from miroculus.com

Taken from miroculus.com

Miriam made its—or more gender specific—her public debut at the TEDGlobal conference in Rio De Janeiro in 2014 with TED curator Chris Anderson calling it ‘one of the most thrilling demos in TED history’, according to Miroculus. To see and hear why this opinion is accurate, and how Miriam will work in concert with a smartphone camera and cloud interface, I urge you to check out the ~11 minute TEDGlobal presentation at this link, which also gives a short, layperson introduction to miRNA biomarkers in blood for cancer.

Oh, One More Thing

Taken from graymatters.com

Taken from graymatters.com

Although this post focuses on nucleic acids, it’s worth noting that protein biomarkers in blood are also being investigated. In view of increased awareness and media attention about concussion injuries in the National Football League (NFL), a timely example of protein biomarkers for diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)—which heretofore has not been possible by any test—is in development.

Currently the only way to diagnose CTE is through a post-mortem autopsy, but Aethlon Medical Inc. intends to change that with the diagnostic test being developed by its subsidiary Exosome Sciences. The test being studied is designed to identify an abnormal protein called tau that builds up in brain tissue as a result of repetitive head trauma. CTE researchers believe that they have developed a means of measuring plasma exosomal tau. Researchers thought that exosomes had potential as a means of identifying CTE because they cross the blood-brain barrier and can provide a unique method of measuring certain aspects of the contents of brain cells through a blood test.

Exosome Science was able to use its diagnostic blood test in 78 NFL players with histories of concussions, as well as in a control group made up of 16 athletes involved in non-contact sports. The subjects are all part of a much larger NIH-funded project called DETECT, which is focused on developing a variety of biomarkers for CTE and involves researchers at Boston University School of Medicine and the University of Washington.

Look for a future post here about DETECT involving nucleic acid biomarkers.

As always, your comments are welcomed.

Genes in Space

  • High School Student’s PCR Experiments Launched to Space Station
  • Program Evaluates Epigenetics Linked to Astronaut’s Altered Immunity
  • Amplyus Has Big Plans for Its Tiny, Low-Cost PCR Device

In my 2013 blog post on the 30th anniversary of the invention of Nobel Prize-winning PCR by Kary Mullis, I ventured to say that PCR of DNA or RNA was the most widely used—and enabling—method for all life sciences on planet Earth. This accolade can now be expanded to extraterrestrial space in view of PCR experiments to be carried out in the International Space Station (ISS) following the April 8th launch from Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard NASA’s Cargo Resupply Services flight (CRS-8).

Taken from earthkam.org

Taken from earthkam.org

What makes this “out of this world” milestone for PCR even more exciting is that it’s the result of competition among students in high school—yes, high school—to conceive and design PCR-based studies relevant to living in space. Following is a brief synopsis of the program, the winning high school student, and a small startup company with big plans for its low-cost miniPCR™ device.
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World’s Smallest Real-Time PCR Device

  • Fits in the Palm of your Hand, and Has Single-Molecule Sensitivity
  • Analyzes 4 Samples, and Can be Modified to do 8 
  • Project Leader Reveals Commercialization Details 

I think we’re all fascinated by catchy headlines touting the world’s biggest, tallest, etc., so a recent publication by Ahrberg et al. in venerable Lab on a Chip claiming the world’s smallest real-time PCR device instantly struck me as blogworthy. It also seemed quite apropos as a follow-up to my previous blogs on the continuing shrinkage, so to speak, of real-time PCR technology for point-of-care qPCR diagnostics or other emerging applications in the field.

This hand-held real-time PCR device, developed by A*STAR Singapore, is amazingly small in comparison to the first real-time PCR system introduced by Applied Biosystems in 1995 that weighed 350 pounds and had a width of 7 feet, thus requiring an entire bench top.

pcr

Left: World’s smallest real-time PCR device. (Taken from Ahrberg et al). Right: Applied Biosystems 7700 real-time PCR system. (Taken from distrobio.com).

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Norovirus: Science Behind the Headline

  • The Virus is Quite Common with 267 Million Cases and 200,000 Deaths Annually
  • RT-PCR is the Detection Method of Choice
  • First Cell-Culture System May Speed Drug and Vaccine Development

We’ve all seen TV news stories about disgruntled passengers disembarking cruise ships returning to port early because of an outbreak of nasty gastroenteritis (i.e. inflammation of the stomach and intestines leading to nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach cramps). Norovirus (NoV) is the causative agent of these frequently reoccurring “nightmare” cruises, of which 13 have been reported since 2012, sickening some 200-600 passengers. It’s not just limited to cruises, the virus affected 100+ students at a school in Eugene, Oregon last year. And now there’s new evidence for transmission of NoV by eating oysters—which I will therefore not eat in the future.

Taken from counselheal.com.

Taken from counselheal.com.

But perhaps the most NoV-related media attention—and investor ire or litigant action—has been recently focused on gastroenteritis outbreaks at Chipotle—a popular restaurant chain. A criminal investigation is under way at Chipotle, and according to an Associated Press report the company has been served with a federal subpoena.

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‘Genospirituality’—In the Spirit of the Holidays

This last blog for 2015 comes at a time when many of us are looking forward to the upcoming holiday season to enjoy, in various ways, being or sharing with family and friends, and reflecting thankfully for what we have. We often refer to this as getting into “the spirit” of the holidays, regardless of one’s religious or secular beliefs.

In this context, and with the nucleic acids research-relatedness of my blogs in mind, I thought it would be apropos to tell you a bit about some intriguing research aimed at assessing genes associated with spirituality, by which is meant “an inner search for enlightenment achieved through practices such as prayer [religious] or meditation [secular]”, as elaborated elsewhere.

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DNA Barcodes to Follow Food and Foil Fraud

  • Fork-to-Farm Traceability Proven Practical
  • Uses qPCR Decoding of DNA Barcode “tags”
  • Consumer Concerns May Curb Commercialization

In earlier blogs here I’ve highlighted how sequencing of DNA barcodes has been used to identify fraudulent food sales—such as cheap meat or fish passed off as expensive steak or sashimi—and the same for mislabeled herbal products. Now, I’d like to share with you some nifty work by researchers who have applied qPCR to detect DNA barcode “tags” to follow foodstuff from your fork back to the farm (or farms) from which it originated.

This is not a simple goal to achieve, scientifically, and would certainly have been exceedingly useful, societally, in tracing the origin of food-related incidents such as listeria-contaminated cantaloupes that led to 29 deaths several years ago. In fact, just a few weeks ago there was a deadly outbreak of salmonella linked to cucumbers imported from Mexico wherein 4 people died and 732 were sickened by the bacteria.

They all look the same, but sometimes it’s very importatnt to find out from where they came. Taken from en.wikipedia

They all look the same, but sometimes it’s very important to find out where they came from. Taken from en.wikipedia

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Point-of-Care PCR 2.0

  • Ubiquitome Quickens Pace of POC Apps for Its Freedom4
  • Cepheid Unveils its POC Diagnostics System
  • Hopkins Crew Brews “Coffee Mug-Sized” Gizmo for Fully Automated Chlamydia Testing
Kiwi Dr. Jo-Ann Stanton holding Ubiquitome’s Freedom4 at Tri-Con 2015

Kiwi Dr. Jo-Ann Stanton holding Ubiquitome’s Freedom4 at Tri-Con 2015

Regular readers of this blog will recall a recent byline exclaiming “Honey I Shrunk the qPCR Machine”, which spotlighted the unveiling of startup company Ubiquitome’s first point-of-care (POC) product—Freedom4—developed in New Zealand. Up until then, this far away—for me—exotic island country brought to mind folks fondly nicknamed Kiwi—after the native flightless bird, not Chinese fruit. Mightily impressed by this tiny but powerful qPCR device, I vowed to thereafter keep an eye on these Kiwis’ democratized POC apps enabled by its nifty handheld 4-sample high-performance qPCR device.

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Gene-Expression Biomarkers Can Detect Depression

  • First-ever Lab Test for Depression Found Using RT-PCR
  • FDA Approval as Diagnostic Possible by Early 2016
  • Huge Potential Market as 1-in-10 US Adults Suffer from Depression

While it’s normal for everyone to occasionally feel blue or sad, prolonged bouts of depression that interfere with normal life are indicative of a serious mental health issue. While there are numerous forms and differing severity of depressive disorders, as described at a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) website, only two factual aspects of this illness really stand out in my opinion:

Redder countries have higher depression rates. Bluer countries have lower depression rates. Taken from The Washington Post.

Redder countries have higher depression rates. Bluer countries have lower depression rates. Taken from The Washington Post.

  • Depression is a very common illness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1-in-10 US adults suffer from depression, which reportedly costs close to $50B annual in lost productivity in the work place. Globally, more than 350 million people of all ages are afflicted with depression, according to recent statistics from the World Health Organization (WHO). By the year 2020, WHO estimates that depression will be the second leading cause of “lost years of healthy life”, following heart disease. Incidentally, as seen from the map below, depression rates around the world vary significantly among countries.
  • Depression is diagnosed based on the patients’ self-report of their symptoms and the evaluation of one or more structured psychiatric interviews with the patient by a psychiatrist, psychologist or primary care physician. The absence of direct, non-subjective measures of depression can lead to relatively lengthy time-to-treatment, non-reporting, or—sorry to say—fraudulent claims and/or treatments based solely on what is said as opposed to what is objectively measured.

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